Could a Robot Learn By Itself?

Ashutosh Saxena

Photo Source Cornell Engineering

“We now live in a world where robots are helping humans in their daily lives, and just like humans, robots need to learn new skills in order to do their jobs successfully. And we shouldn’t expect a robot to learn on its own from scratch, any more than we’d expect a human to do so—imagine a child growing up with no access to textbooks, libraries, or the Internet.” – Ashutosh Saxena

What if robots could learn to carry out tasks autonomously? In other words, when giving a robot a new task it could “figure out” on it’s own how to do it? This is exactly the question that Ashutosh Saxena is working to answer.

Professor Saxena is a roboticist at Cornell University working to develop a massive online search engine that robots could access and find the required knowledge to carry out tasks, the aptly named RoboBrain. When given a question, RoboBrain will search the internet for relevant knowledge databases and images, sidestepping the need to teach robots to do tasks through step by step instructions.

“In 2014, I started a project called RoboBrain at Cornell University along with PhD students Ashesh Jain and Ozan Sener. We now have collaborators at Stanford and Brown. What we’re working on is a way of sharing information that allows robots to gather whatever knowledge they need for a task,” writes Saxena. “If one robot learns, then the knowledge is propagated to all the robots. RoboBrain achieves this by gathering the knowledge from a variety of sources. The system stores multiple kinds of information, including symbols, natural language, visual or shape features, haptic properties, and motions.”

The implications of such a project, if successful, could be enormous. It would lead to an increase in efficiency and reduce downtime and spending spent in “training” robots how to carry out tasks. RoboBrain could also lead to robots with more capacity to carry out objectives than previously intended.

Saxena’s work has garnered him several awards and recognition, including Eight Innovators to Watch in 2015, Smithsonian Institution; World Technology Award, 2015; The 50-years of Shakey at AAAI-RSS Blue Sky Ideas award, 2015; RSS Early Career Award, 2014; NSF Career award, 2013; Microsoft Faculty Fellow, 2012; Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, 2011; Best Cognitive Robotics paper, IROS’14. Best student paper, RSS’13; CUAir at AUVSI’12: First prize, mission performance; Google Faculty Research Award, 2012.

These breakthroughs in robotic learning coupled with the unparalleled potential of a developed RoboBrain is what makes Ashush Saxena our pick for “Featured Innovator of the Month.”

Note: Ashush Saxena does not work for Willamette Valley Company nor is he affiliated with our company.

Sources:

Stanford University

Rethink Robotics Youtube

MIT Technology Review

Smithsonian

Yaskawa Motoman Offers Tips on How to Select a Robotics Integrator

Motoman-PartnerThe 4 “Cs” to Selecting a Robotics Integrator

We are proud of the outstanding work and research being conducted by our robotics division, PRE-TEC, the largest custom robotic integrator on the West Coast. In the past decade alone, PRE-TEC has prepared more than 165 robotic systems thanks in part to the valuable partnerships we have with leading robotics companies like Yaskawa Motoman.

Yaskawa Motoman is an industry leader in the rapidly growing robotics field, and we’re proud our PRE-TEC division is a premier Motoman Strategic Partner.

Sam Schenck, Director of Strategic Partner Relations at Yaskawa America, Inc. – Motoman Robotics Division, recently wrote a piece for the company’s blog that offers valuable advice on how to select a robotics integrator. “Ultimately, picking the right robotics integrator is about making the part you want to make at the rate, quality and timing you need,” he writes in his recent post, 4 Things to Consider When Selecting a Robotics Integrator. “There are 4 “Cs” to sizing up any integrator; I define them as concept, cost, capabilities and capacity”.

Here is a quick summary of his advice.

1. Don’t accept claims that can’t be supported by evidence.

2. Be aware that the proposal price might not be your “all-in cost” for automation.

3. Regarding support, if you want an integrator to be available for immediate, on-site help should problems arise, make sure they have a support presence in your region.

4. If they have the capabilities you need, ask how much of their work is sub-contracted. You want to know if they are a net aggregator of pieces or a producer. Work with the latter, not the former.

Click here to read the full article.

FANUC America Introduces New CR-35iA Collaborative Robot Designed to Work Alongside Humans

FANUC_America_CR-35iA_Collaborative_robot

The FANUC CR-35iA collaborative robot allows shared workspace between an operator and the interactive robot. (Photo: Business Wire)

WVCO’s strategic robotics partner, FANUC America Corporation, recently announced the company has developed it’s new CR-35iA collaborative robot, the industry’s first 35 kg payload force limited collaborative robot designed to work alongside humans without the need for safety fences.

“The FANUC CR-35iA collaborative robot allows shared workspace between an operator and the interactive robot,” said Greg Buell, product manager, FANUC America. “The highly-sensitive robot gently stops if it comes in contact with the operator, allowing the robot and human to work side by side; in fact, FANUC currently has units running in production at General Motors.”

The CR-35iA robot was developed to help manufacturers solve ergonomic challenges by handling applications that are physically demanding for humans, such as heavy lifting.The robot’s shell is green to distinguish the collaborative robot from the standard yellow FANUC robots.

WVCO is proud to have a long time partnership with organizations like FANUC America.  Our robotics division, PRE-TEC, has partnered with the company to develop automated manufacturing solutions using six axis robots and other precision equipment for customers all over the world. Earlier this year, we introduced introduced M2000iA, FANUC’s largest robot available in the North American market.

Large Robots

Standing with M2000iA

Click here to learn more about FANUC’s CR-35iA collaborative robot. You can also visit the company’s website at www.fanucamerica.com.

About FANUC America Corporation
FANUC America Corporation is a subsidiary of FANUC CORPORATION in Japan, and provides industry-leading robotics, CNC systems, and factory automation. FANUC’s innovative technologies and proven expertise help manufacturers in the Americas maximize efficiency, reliability and profitability.