Benefits of Building Schools with Cross Laminated Timber (CLT)

Mass Timber Buildings

Is Wood the Future of New School Construction?

“Supporters hail mass timber’s potential: the ability to speed up construction timelines in an industry plagued by inefficiencies; less environmental wear and tear; an attractive visual aesthetic; and the economic contribution of skilled jobs in an emerging industry.” They’re also quick to note wood construction at this scale is not new — and that mass timber is different from the assemblages of two-by-fours and plywood that frame American homes.” –educationdive.com

By now, you might have heard us rave about the benefits of building with mass timber. Building with engineered wood products like cross-laminated wood (CLT) has soared in popularity in recent years across the country, specifically in educational settings, and it’s no wonder! Studies show CLT can improve health and well-being, and offer more design flexibility, durability, fire resistance, as well as multiple environmental benefits. Now that students are heading back to school, we thought we’d look at the advantages of building schools with cross-laminated timber (CLT).  

Simple, Quick Construction

One of the greatest advantages of cross-laminated timber (CLT) is the speed of installation. Cross-Laminated Timber panels are lightweight and arrive at site with a structural system ready to be assembled. The process is both simple and swift, allowing immediate and accurate construction, which in turn saves time and money. 

Durability

The alternating fibers in CLT make it a lightweight, yet strong and durable building material. In Japan, a seven-story CLT building’s durability in an earthquake scenario was tested through fourteen shake-tests and came out with minimal damage. Airtight construction of each panel and precision fitting leads to seismic resilience, as does its unique strength-to-weight ratio.

Fire-Resistant

Though it may sound strange to tout fire resistance as a benefit of a wooden building material, it’s one of Cross-Laminated Timber’s greatest strengths. The lamination of CLT has inherent fire resistance, and the construction of the panels and structures allows little room for fire to breathe and expand. 

Sustainability

Another advantage to building with Cross-Laminated Timber is its light carbon footprint. CLT stores more carbon than is emitted in its manufacture and transport. It continues to store carbon absorbed by the tree while growing, keeping it out of the atmosphere for the lifetime of the building. Mass timber is the only building material that can be regrown and feasible in the long-term. Precision cutting of CLT minimizes on-site waste, and its manufacturing requires less energy than producing steel or concrete. 

Acoustic Insulation

Solid wood paneling provides superior acoustic insulation, dampening both airborne and impact noises. Its lightweight nature also leads to quiet construction, making it ideal for schools and college campuses. 

Thermal Insulation

In the same way that Cross-Laminated Timber’s airtight design creates auditory insulation, it also creates thermal insulation. Tightly packed panels can trap 90% of the heat that would ordinarily escape from a home. CLT’s previously-mentioned high thermal mass ensures temperatures are kept stable and comfortable.

Pleasing Aesthetic

There’s a warm, soothing visual quality to building with wood that separates it from the lifeless concrete slabs that typically fill a city. The term “biophilia” describes the soothing effect that natural materials have on humans. Studies suggest that natural building materials like Cross-Laminated Timber can help lower stress in students and teachers and increase productivity. 

Affordable

When comparing the manufacturing costs of certain steels and concrete, as well as the money saved on shorter construction time, CLT comes out as at a competitive

Examples of Schools Using Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) Architecture

These examples of cross-laminated timber (CLT) architecture in educational settings demonstrate why CLT is an excellent alternative for more conventional building materials like steel and concrete.

Franklin Elementary School- Franklin, West Virginia 
When Franklin, West Virginia needed a new elementary school, the small, rural community decided to try something that no other school district had undertaken in this country: build with cross laminated timber (CLT). The decision to build with CLT has paid off in dividends! Learn more by reading the case study. 

Andy Quattlebaum Outdoor Recreation Center – Clemson University, SC  
Brian Campa, principal at the architecture firm that designed the outdoor rec center on the campus of Clemson University, says he chose CLT as a building material for its ability to achieve long spans and lower cost of the material. Campa also lauds CLT for its significant sustainable advantages, including a lower carbon footprint. The aesthetically pleasing building intentionally connects visitors of the building with nature. “These biophilic elements are emphasized to encourage student wellness, activity, and interaction. We believe the center will become a hub for those looking for an on-campus escape,” says Campa. Read more.

Idaho Central Credit Union Arena – Moscow, Idaho
Construction for this 4,000-plus capacity arena on the University of Idaho campus is well underway on this first-of-its-kind engineered wood mass-timber facility. The versatile, visually stunning ICCU Arena will open in fall 2021 and will be the new home for Vandal men’s and women’s basketball teams, as well as a gathering place for academic events, concerts and other special events. Read more.

Sequim School District – Sequim, Washington
School district leaders in this small Washington community felt the speed of construction and environmental and economic advantages made cross-laminated timber (CLT) an ideal building material for modular classrooms in a pilot project.  Read more

Here are some additional examples of more U.S. & Canadian schools who use mass timber in their construction. 

About Willamette Valley Company 
Since launching as a small business distributing mill supplies to the wood products industry in 1952, WVCO has grown into a leading supplier of problem-solving products and services in many industries around the world. Some of WVCO’s high-performance solutions include coatings, fillers, adhesives, robotics, parts, engineering and more. Companies across the globe continually turn to us first for custom solutions to their specific challenges. What can Willamette Valley Company do for you today? Find out now.

 

How Engineered Wood Products Are Changing the Way We Build

These innovative mass timber projects are changing the way we think about building with wood. 

 Mass Timber Projects That Demonstrate the Power of Engineered Wood

Wood has been the go-to building material since the dawn of humanity, however, the advancements in the wood products industry have made this “old” standby seem new again. The beneficial properties and pleasing aesthetics of engineered products are inspiring architects, engineers, and builders to reimagine the possibilities of wood. 

Through advancements in technology and design, engineered wood products are helping usher in a new era of office and residential buildings in urban settings. We could point to hundreds of building projects that demonstrate the power of building with engineered wood products. However, here are just a few case studies that highlight how engineered wood products like Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) and Glulam are being incorporated in modern building designs throughout North America. 

APA Case Study: Kelowna Office Building– 3935 Lakeshore Rd
Location: Kelowna, British Columbia

Kelowna-Office-Building- Source APA Wood

Kelowna-Office-Building- Source APA Wood

This 3-story, 14,000 square-foot office building is framed with glulam post and beam, with CLT making up the floor and roof systems. According to this case study published by the APA – The Engineered Wood Association, CLT provided an unprecedented level of structural integrity, design flexibility, and cost-competiveness with a high level of aesthetic value, thanks to the natural beauty of wood. Click here to learn more about this project.  

APA Case Study: Winfield Gate 
Location: Houston, Texas

Winfield Gate.Source APA-Wood

Winfield Gate.Source APA-Wood

This upscale development of 4,000- to 6,000-square foot, four-story luxury townhomes uses wood structural frames and demonstrate the load-carrying capacities of engineered wood glulam beams. “There’s no question that glulam help us achieve our design goals,” says Andy Suman, partner at Röwe & Wright, developer/builder. The glulam also helped meet the area’s high-wind load requirements. Other engineered wood products utilized in this project include open-web wood trusses, OSB subflooring, and walls fully sheathed in 1/2-inch plywood. Click here to download this case study.

APA Case Study: Brelsford WSU Visitor Center 
Location: Pullman, Washington 

APA Case Study-Brelsford WSU Visitor Center

APA Case Study-Brelsford WSU Visitor Center – Source APA

The Brelsford WSU Visitor Center is a functional showcase of several engineered wood products, inspiring and educating visitors on wood’s aesthetic and structural capabilities. Mountain pine beetle-killed wood was used extensively throughout the interior, too. Click here to download this case study. 

APA Case Study: Atlantic Station Project
Location: Atlanta, Georgia

Atlantic Station- Photo Source APA Wood

Atlantic Station- Photo Source APA Wood

Engineered wood is spotlighted in this case study of an award-winning development built in Atlantic Station, an urban renewal project located in Atlanta. Wood’s design versatility and sustainability are highlighted in the construction of two of Atlantic Stations’ high-density residential projects on the site of the former Atlantic Steel Mill. Click here to download this case study. 

1430 Q 
Location: Sacramento, California

D & S Development made construction and engineering history by creating the first building in the U.S. that included six levels of livable space framed in wood over a 2 story concrete podium. At the time it was built, 1430 Q’s the tallest wood frame building at 85ft. tall and unlocked more potential for building with wood. State of the art fireproofing and engineering gives its tenants the highest standards of fire safety, as it now takes 2-hours for a fire to burn through one wall. 

Case Study: Origine 
Location: Quebec City, Quebec

Origine-ThinkWood

Origine- Photo Source: Think Wood

 
At 13-stories high, Origine is among the world’s tallest all-wood residential towers in eastern North America. This distinguished landmark was constructed using cross-laminated timber (CLT) and is part of an ever-expanding roster of mass timber multifamily projects across Canada.

As a company that serves the Wood Products Industry, It’s exciting to witness this new era of innovative timber-built projects. 

Click here to see more construction projects and even more innovative wood buildings that are changing how we live and work. To learn more, visit CLT Basics on www.apawood.org & Is the Construction Industry About to Enter a Timber Age? on our blog.

Increased Exposure to Wood Can Improve Health and Well Being

Growing Evidence Suggests Biophilic Designs of Hospitals, Offices, Schools, and Other Buildings Can Regulate Stress Levels

Wood has been used as a building material for thousands of years, but we’re only beginning to truly understand its benefits. Building with wood has not merely practical and environmental benefits, but it has also been linked to better physiological and psychological wellbeing. Not only is wood aesthetically pleasing, but environments with wooden structures are also shown to cause a drop in blood pressure, lower the pulse, and have a calming effect. The result is enhanced productivity and learning, reduced stress, and improved focus. This natural phenomenon is often referred to as the Biophilia Effect and there is science behind it.

Biophilic Designs

Human beings are meant to be in nature, but modern society dictates more of our time being spent indoors rather than outdoors. To remedy this, more building designers are incorporating natural elements like exposed wood, natural light, and plants into their building structure. This concept is often referred to as biophilic design, the idea that spending time in a more natural setting can improve physical and mental health for the people who live, work, and gather in the space. The trend of biophilic design in offices and other workplaces has been growing for years.

Though research on the biophilic properties of wood is still in its early stages, there is a growing body of evidence that increased exposure to natural elements can result in an impressive list of beneficial effects, including but not limited to better learning rates, lower blood pressure, reduced stress, and faster healing. The white paper, WHY DO WE FEEL BETTER WITH WOOD?, examines the benefits of biophilic design, and the growing body of research behind it. Here are some other examples of researchers studying the physiological and psychological impact of natural elements: 

Environmental psychologist Dr. Sally Augustin and researcher Dr. David Fell found humans automatically relax when they are surrounded by views of nature, natural light, plants, and exposed wood upon their review of existing research from the U.S., Canada, Austria, and other countries. Fell (2010) studied the autonomic responses of 119 subjects in wood and non-wood offices before, during, and after a stressful mental task. In this study, sympathetic nervous system activation was lower in the wood room. Skin conductance level was lower in the wood office during the pre-and post-test periods. Further, the rate of non-specific skin conductance responses, measurable divergent stressful thoughts, in the wood office was less than half that as in the non-wood office.
Source- Wood as a Restorative Material in Healthcare Environments, February 2015 

Marjut Wallenius, a Docent and Doctor of Psychology at the University of Tampere concluded use of wood promotes the health and well-being of mind and body in her research, “Wood has psychological effects on people and a similar stress-reducing effect to nature,” she says. 
Source – Wood Construction Reduces Stress and Offers a Healthy Living Environment 

Wood was associated with decreased blood pressure in an Austrian study; high school students who were taught in classrooms with floors, ceilings, and walls finished in real wood had lower heart rates than students taught in classrooms with no wood elements (Kelz et al., 2011). Besides having lower heart rates, students in the wood classrooms also reported lower levels of stress than those in non-wood classrooms. 
Source- Wood in the human environment : restorative properties of wood in the built indoor environment

A Japanese study comparing physical and emotional responses to viewing wood versus steel panels found that wood had both physiological and psychological advantages over steel (Sakuragawa et al., 2005). Wood panels were associated with decreased depression or dejection, while steel increased both. Aside from mood, researchers measured a difference in blood pressure as well: wood panels were associated with decreased blood pressure or no change, while steel was associated with increased blood pressure. 
Source- Nature in Design: The Biophilia Effect

Forest and Wood Products Australia commissioned a study that linked nature, biophilic design, and wood with improved physical and mental wellbeing. The study surveyed 1,000 Australian workers and found a correlation between the presence of wood and employees’ satisfaction at work, lower absenteeism, higher levels of concentration, and improved productivity. 
Source- “Workplaces: Wellness+ Wood = Productivity”

Willamette Valley Company offers some of the most innovative wood products solutions in the industry, including patches, fillers, extenders, coatings, inks, abrasives, tapes, and a wide variety of outstanding application equipment and parts. What can Willamette Valley Company do for you today? Find out now.

Tapel Willamette Celebrates 20 Years in Business!

Tapel Willamette

Tapel Willamette, Willamette Valley Company’s South American division, recently celebrated 20 years in business- a major milestone! When it began operations in May 2000 the company had just 7 employees and was headquartered in a small warehouse near downtown Concepción, Chile. Today, Tapel Willamette is a leading supplier for the industrial, environmental, and wood products industries, providing innovative solutions and services all over the world from their current headquarters in Coronel, Chile.

Coronel, Chile

The company has faced its share of challenges through the years – the subprime crisis, the earthquake in 2010, climate change, the current coronavirus pandemic, and a 2019 national social and political crisis in Chile that resulted in widespread strikes and road closures. Despite these challenges, the Tapel Willamette team stepped up and continued to supply high-quality solutions to their customers by following a simple credo:

“Nos asociamos a través del servicio, la innovación y la integridad”- We partner through service, innovation, and integrity.

It is this commitment to quality, service, and innovation that has made Tapel Willamette a success story.  

Tapel Willamette 2020

Not even a global pandemic can stop our Tapel Willamette team from serving our customers and essential businesses.

Tapel Willamette

After the 2010 Earthquake

Tapel Willamette is verified with Responsible Care, which reaffirms their commitment to the community, to the environment and to all those who are part of our business activities. The company demonstrated this commitment by participating in initiatives like this hydrological restoration program to reduce the environmental, social, and economic vulnerability generated by the mega-fires of the summer of 2017. 

We are very proud of our Tapel family!!! For more information, please visit www.tapel.cl

Obtenga más información visitando www.tapel.cl

photo credit: Oscar Maltez via photopin cc

Headed for Tucson for the 2019 Engineered Wood Technology Association (EWTA) Info Fair!

2019 Info FairThe WVCO team is thrilled to once again join APA member manufacturers, EWTA members, suppliers and hundreds of other wood products industry professionals from all over the country November 2-4, 2019 at the JW Marriott Starr Pass in Tucson, Arizona for the 2019 Engineered Wood Technology Association (EWTA) Info Fair, the premier supplier exhibition for North America’s engineered product manufacturers.

Each year, managers and executives from the top engineered wood products associations, the Engineered Wood Technology Association( EWTA) and APA – The Engineered Wood Association gather to review and discuss key issues affecting the wood products industry.

Willamette Valley Company in San Antonio for the EWTA Info Fair

Willamette Valley Company team at the EWTA Info Fair. Photo @EWTA Info Fair Facebook Page

Willamette Valley Company has a long-standing history as with this important annual event, and we always look forward to it. Last year, WVCO was honored with the APA Supplier of the Year award for the fourth year in a row and for the 9th time overall.

“It forges great partnerships,” says Willamette Valley Company Vice President, Tony Vuksich. “It allows us to interface with the management of many of our very important clients, and support EWTA in a mutually beneficial setting.”

The APA 2015 Supplier Award Winners: Hunt, Guillot & Associates LLC, Panel World Magazine/Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc., Willamette Valley Company and KADANT Carmanah Design

The APA 2015 Supplier Award Winners:
Hunt, Guillot & Associates LLC, Panel World Magazine/Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc., Willamette Valley Company and KADANT Carmanah Design

Come see us in Booth #216 and learn more about our wide variety of wood products and custom solutions relating to plywood, LVL, OSB, lumber, cabinets and furniture, moldings, doors, trims and fascia, overlays and more!

Association Teamwork
The Engineered Wood Technology Association is a related non-profit corporation of APA – The Engineered Wood Association. EWTA represents companies that provide products and services to the engineered wood products manufacturing industry and is based in Tacoma, Wash. APA – The Engineered Wood Association has a long history of providing quality service and programs to its nearly 160 member mills in the engineered wood products industry. A key to APA’s success is the teamwork between EWTA’s supplier members and APA’s member manufacturers. To learn more, visit www.engineeredwood.org

You can also visit the event’s Facebook Page to see more photos and recaps of this year’s event.

APA – The Engineered Wood Association Publishes New Engineered Wood Case Studies

WVCO is proud of its longstanding partnership with the APA – The Engineered Wood Association, a nonprofit trade association for engineered wood product manufacturers. APA represents approximately 150 mills throughout North America, ranging in size and structure. The association is considered the “Leading Resource for Information About Engineered Wood Products”.

This month, the organization published two new case studies illustrating the benefits of engineered wood and mass timber products. Both case studies are available as free downloads on the APA website, www.apawood.org.

Beauty and the Budget APA-Wood Case Study
Photo @ APA – The Engineered Wood Association

Beauty and the Budget showcases Portland, Oregon, LEVER Architecture’s use of plywood and mass timber elements throughout the Flex building, a multi-purpose structure in Portland. In addition to exposed plywood for the shear walls, the LEVER team used exposed glulam beams throughout and glulam for the stairs as well.

“Innovative use of wood allows us to create powerful architecture even for projects with limited budgets,” architect George Michael Rusch said. “When you can use mass timber for its inherent structural properties, you can make buildings that speak volumes. It’s about the morality of the material.”

Download Case Study: Beauty and the Budget or visit www.apawood.org. 

APA Case Study-Mass Timber Has Banks Seeing Green
Photo @ APA – The Engineered Wood Association

Mass Timber has Banks Seeing Green features the new First United Bank branches in Shawnee, Oklahoma, and Fredericksburg, Texas. Both the first mass timber structures in their states, these net-zero buildings were designed with engineered wood for economic and sustainability reasons.

“First United wanted buildings that really showed how they were built and related to their customer base,” according to Gensler project architect Taylor Coleman. “Using mass timber was the best way to accomplish those goals.”

Download Mass Timber has Banks Seeing Green or visit www.apawood.org.

APA – The Engineered Wood Association is a nonprofit trade association that works with its members to create structural wood products of exceptional strength, versatility, and reliability. Combining the research efforts of scientists and engineers at APA’s 42,000 square-foot research center with the knowledge gained from decades of fieldwork, and cooperation with our member manufacturers, APA promotes new solutions and improved processes that benefit the entire industry.

Learn more about APA – The Engineered Wood Association.

Is Cross-Laminated Timber a Game Changer?

Cross Laminated Timber

If you haven’t already heard of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) by now, you will.  More and more architects and designers are making the switch to building with Cross-Laminated Timber, some even going as far to refer to it as the “Concrete of the 21st Century”.

Nearly every day, there is news about new multi-family and commercial structures constructed using this seemingly “magical” material. It’s even being embraced by mainstream companies like McDonald’s.  In fact, demand for this material is expected to grow by as much as 15% over the next decade.

But what is it? Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a large-scale, prefabricated, solid engineered wood panel that is made up of kiln-dried wooden boards stacked in alternating directions (where the cross of the name comes from), then stuck together with structural adhesives. While at the mill, CLT panels are cut to size, including door and window openings, with state-of-the art CNC (Computer Numerical Controlled) routers, capable of making complex cuts with high precision. Finished panels are typically 2 to 10 feet wide, with lengths up to 60 feet and thickness up to 20 inches.

Watch the video below for more details:

What are the Benefits of Cross-Laminated Timber? CLT is lightweight yet very strong, with superior acoustic, fire, seismic, and thermal performance making it ideal for long spans in walls, floors, and roofs. It’s also fast and easy to install, generating almost no waste onsite. Finished CLT panels are exceptionally stiff, strong, and stable. Other benefits include:

Simple, Quick Construction
CLT panels are lightweight and arrive on site with a structural system ready to be assembled. The process is both simple and swift, allowing for immediate and accurate construction which in turn saves time and money.

Fire-Resistant
Though it may sound strange to tout fire-resistance as a benefit of a wooden building material, it’s one of Cross-Laminated Timber’s greatest strengths. The lamination of CLT has an inherent fire-resistance to it, and the construction of the panels and structures allows little room for fire to spread. Additionally, the solid thermal mass of CLT prevents the conduction of heat from one side of the panel to the other, allowing extremely high temperatures to remain isolated to a side as the other remains at room temperature.

Sustainable
The nature of wood makes it the only building material that can be regrown and feasible in the long-term. Precision cutting of CLT minimizes on-site waste and its manufacturing requires less energy than producing steel or concrete. Cross-Laminated Timber’s light carbon footprint is one of its greatest strengths.

Acoustic Insulation
Solid wood paneling provides superior acoustic insulation, dampening both airborne and impact noises. Its lightweight nature also leads to quiet construction, making it ideal for urban development.

Thermal Insulation
In the same way that Cross-Laminated Timber’s airtight design creates auditory insulation it also creates thermal insulation. Tightly packed panels can trap 90% of the heat that would ordinarily escape from a home. CLT’s previously-mentioned high thermal mass means that temperatures are kept stable and comfortable.

Pleasing Aesthetics
There’s a warm, soothing visual quality to building with wood that separates it from the lifeless concrete slabs that typically fill a city. Cross-Laminated Timber also grants designers with the freedom to experiment with more organic and creative structures than previously allowed by old-fashioned building techniques.

When comparing the manufacturing costs of certain steels and concrete, as well as the money saved on shorter construction time, CLT comes out as at a competitive price.

To learn more, visit CLT Basics on www.apawood.org & Is the Construction Industry About to Enter a Timber Age? on our blog.

Photo labeled for reuse @ flickr.com/photos/designmilk

2018 International Mass Timber Conference

“We believe that a greater use of cross-laminated timber and other mass timber products in mid- to high-rise building construction is the innovative, disruptive, modern, and sustainable choice necessary for building in a fast-growing world.”

masstimberconference.com

As one of the world’s top companies in the wood products industry, Willamette Valley Company continues to strive to be on the forefront of the advancement and possibilities of the mass timber industry and cross-laminated timber. Last week, WVCO proudly represented our wood products division at the 2018 International Mass Timber Conference, the premier, global conference for cross-laminated timber and other mass timber construction.

This conference, co-produced by WoodWorks and the Forest Business Network, is one of the largest gatherings of mass timber experts in the world. Architects, engineers, city planners, representatives from major construction companies, mass timber manufacturers, designers, fire officials, mass timber equipment suppliers, representatives from sawmills and many more gathered in Portland, Oregon for the 3-day event packed with presentations and learning opportunities from international experts and presentations.

Demand for cross-laminated timber and construction is growing all over the world. Recently, a new study by Grand View Research, Inc suggests the growing demand for sustainable houses made from wood is likely to drive the global cross-laminated timber market. The report states that the “market is expected to reach a valuation of USD 2.07 billion by 2025. Rising awareness among consumers regarding wooden products and increasing number of suppliers for cross-laminated timber (CLT) are likely to augment the growth. Based on product type, the market can be classified as adhesive bonded and mechanically fastened CLT.”

As more and more evidence is suggesting that CLT is the future of the construction and building industry, the Willamette Valley Company will certainly be participating in more of these types of conventions and pledges to remain one of the top innovators in the wood products industry.

 

WVCO Named “APA Supplier of the Year “for Third Year in a Row!

Photo via APA – The Engineered Wood Association

Huntington Beach, California- Earlier this week, WVCO was named APA Supplier of the Year for the third year in a row and for the 8th time in 11 years at the APA Annual Meeting held in conjunction with the EWTA Info Fair.

EWTA’s Supplier of the Year Awards are based on the quality and delivery of EWTA member products, equipment and/or services supplied to APA members, as determined by a vote of APA mill managers.

EWTA Supplier of the Year

The EWTA Info Fair is a product and services exposition featuring equipment manufacturers, product suppliers and service providers from other EWTA member companies. WVCO has participated as an (EWTA) Info Fair Gold Level sponsor for a number of years and has been honored with numerous awards for our wood products. Last year, in addition to “Supplier of the Year”, the WVCO team was also recognized with the prestigious “Innovation of the Year” award for our new product Wil-Spray 500. It was the first time that the same company won both awards in the same year!

These awards mean a great deal to our company because it is a reflection of the quality and delivery of products, equipment and/or services, as determined by a vote of APA members.

The Engineered Wood Technology Association is a related non-profit corporation of APA – The Engineered Wood Association. EWTA represents companies that provide products and services to the engineered wood products manufacturing industry. EWTA is based in Tacoma, Wash. Read more about EWTA here.

Event Recap: 2015 EWTA Info Fair and APA Annual Meeting

EWTA Info Fair

Photos via EWTA Info Fair on Facebook

2015 EWTA Info Fair and APA Annual Meeting in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho: A Look Back to Our Future

Last month, the WVCO team joined 75 exhibitors and hundreds of professionals from the wood products industry for the 2015 Engineered Wood Technology Association (EWTA) Info Fair, the premier supplier exhibition for North America’s engineered product manufacturers. The Info Fair is held in conjunction with APA – The Engineered Wood Association’s Annual Meeting.

This year’s product and services exposition, which celebrated the 70th Anniversary of the Engineered Wood Technology Association, was the perfect blend of past, present and future.

Many of you may recall that October 21, 2015 was “Back to the Future Day” a tribute to the beloved “Back to the Future Series”. So it was fitting that the theme of the 2015 APA Annual Meeting & EWTA Info Fair, held October 17-19, was “APA Looks Back-To-Our-Future: Driving the Road to Success!” There was even a DeLorean on display!

Willamette Valley Company has a long standing history with this annual event, and we always look forward to it. “Info Fair is the best exhibition that we do,” says Tony Vuksich, Vice President of Northwest Sales, The Willamette Valley Company. “It allows us to interface with the management of many of our very important clients, and support EWTA in a mutually beneficial setting.”

This year, WVCO was a Gold Sponsor of the EWTA Reception and proud to help sponsor the Mike St. John Memorial Golf Tournament, an Annual Golf Tournament to honor the life of Pacific Woodtech executive and APA trustee, Mike St. John.

In addition to the exciting opportunity to introduce our latest wood products solutions to members of our industry, WVCO was honored with a 2015 Supplier Award/a> at the Chairman’s Dinner and Safety Awards Recognition!

Read APA and EWTA Members Travel “Back to Our Future” at 2015 Annual Meeting to learn more about the highlights from this year’s Annual Meeting. You can also visit the event’s Facebook Page to see more photos and recaps of this year’s event.

The Engineered Wood Technology Association is a related non-profit corporation of APA – The Engineered Wood Association. EWTA represents companies that provide products and services to the engineered wood products manufacturing industry and is based in Tacoma, Wash. To learn more, visit www.engineeredwood.org.